arirang mobile

20th edition of MMCA's biennial 'Young Korean Artists' exhibition features 15 emerging artists
Updated: 2021-06-04 13:55:21 KST
It's Friday, and that means it's time for our regular 'Life With Culture' segment.
Our culture correspondent Kim Bo-kyoung is here with us at the studio to tell us what to look up for this weekend. Bo-kyoung I heard that you visited an exhibition that showcases the future of Korean art?

That's right, Mok-yeon, Art lovers, especially those interested in installation art may well know internationally-acclaimed artist Lee Bul, who is actually more famous on the global stage than here in South Korea as she's had lots of solo exhibitions at museums abroad. Well, interesting fact the artist first gained recognition after being introduced at the MMCA's special exhibition program. This biennial exhibition has come back with works from 15 emerging artists. Let's see what kinds of artwork stand at the forefront of contemporary art.


Lee Bul, Choi Jeonghwa and Lee Hyungkoo.
These well-recognized Korean artists were first introduced through the National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art's "Young Korean Artists" program.

"As one of a premier exhibition programs held by the MMCA, "Young Korean Artists" was first held in 1981, making this year its 40th anniversary."

The exhibition has been discovering and housing emerging artists based on the MMCA curators' recommendations and outside experts' research and discussion.
The curator says this year showcases 15 boundary-pushing artists who come up with art through an extended range of media.

"It is meaningful to present artists who have explored their own artistic properties in a variety of fields such as painting, sculptures, installations, media-art, pottery and photography."

One artist tried to show the need for ecological balance in our lives using natural materials such as weeds and clay, while another found motives from Dante's "Divine Comedy" and used porcelain to show human desires and anxiety.
Though each artist varies in how they express their perspectives on society, there was one experience they all had in common: the pandemic.
One artist focused on how the pandemic has made lots of people nostalgic.

"I have restored a record store from a bright city during the late 1980s and early 90s to show the times when economy was developing fast. I used hi-fi audio and old records. Such images usually serve as the background of the 'city-pop' genre too."

Another artist filmed an acrobat navigating an abandoned water intake plant, showing how in unprecedented times of disaster, physical senses can be more valid than knowledge.
Those interested in seeing Korea's young artists' adventurous attitudes can find the exhibition at the MMCA in Gwacheon until September 22nd.

I am sure those who visit the exhibition will be fascinated by the cutting-edge works on display. I hear you also have some exciting news for musical lovers.

Totally, I am sure lots of people would love to visit London's West End and see big-name musicals such as Wicked and the Lion King.
As travel is difficult these days, on 3AM Monday, Korean time, "The Shows Must Go On" a showcase of 18 London musicals all on one stage together will be live-streamed on YouTube.
This show featuring the world's most iconic musicals has been on stage at the Palace Theatre from June 2nd.

"Well, this is the first time all, you know, all of these West End shows have been together on one stage, and I think after everything that's happened, we needed that solidarity. And we needed that kind of union and coming together."

The live broadcast follows "The Shows Must Go On" campaign, which raised over 900-thousand euros for theater charities.
And for those who don't fancy getting up in the early hours of the morning to watch it, don't worry, the performance will be available online for free for seven days after the livestream.

That sounds like a real treat for musical lovers. Thank you Bo-kyoung for sharing with us these cultural updates.

Thank you.
Reporter : reina5467@gmail.com