arirang mobile

When will South Korea's space rocket launch after delay and what comes next?
Updated: 2022-06-17 05:45:18 KST
Space scientists are still inspecting the South Korean rocket Nuri which was supposed to lift off Thursday, after a day's delay due to weather, but was indefinitely postponed, due to a malfunctioning component.
A sensor on the oxidizer tank appeared to fail during a final check-up before the launch.
While officials say the launch window remains open until next Thursday, if the problem is not identified and resolved, Nuri could stay put at the Naro Space Center until late Autumn after the rainy season subsides.
Still, the Nuri has brought Korea's space program on leaps and bounds over the years of its development and we discuss its journey ahead with Kang Sung-ju, Research Officer of the Astronomy & Space Team at Gwacheon National Science Museum.
We also connect with Wendy N. Whitman Cobb, Professor of Strategy and Security Studies at the School of Advanced Air and Space Studies.

1.
KANG: The launch of the first homegrown space rocket, Nuri, was delayed twice. First due to the weather and then for a technical glitch. What exactly happened?

2.
KANG: How are the developers dealing with the situation now? And when could we launch Nuri?

3.
COBB: What's your take on the technical glitches with the oxidiser that postponed the launch of Nuri?
When do you see the launch resuming?

4.
COBB: When the launch does happen, and if it turns out to be a success what would be the significance in terms of space technology?

5.
KANG: Even though the launch failed to put a dummy satellite into orbit last time, there must have been lessons from it. What did we learn from the last launch and how has it affected current launch plans?

6.
COBB: Many countries are keen on building their own rocket launch system including South Korea. Are there any differences that distinguish South Korea's rocket?

7.
What significance would the successful launch of Nuri have on the development of S. Korea's space tech, and what comes next?

8.
COBB: What would be the next major tasks for KARI in terms of South Korea's space programme if successful? And what have the other six countries done after their first successful launches?

Kang Sung-ju, Research Officer of the Astronomy & Space Team at Gwacheon National Science Museum.
Wendy N. Whitman Cobb, Associate Professor of Strategy and Security Studies at the School of Advanced Air and Space Studies.
Thank you for your time today.
Reporter : osy@arirang.com